RE-IMAGINING HEALTH CARE SECURITY: LESSONS FROM THE FIELD

RE-IMAGINING HEALTH CARE SECURITY: LESSONS FROM THE FIELD

At Techumen we recognize that health care providers have highly complex clinical and business processes. In turn, these core functions rely on a large, distributed, computing and communications environment. We also recognize that the demands on computing for health care will be heightened as burgeoning new care areas like population health with its attendant large data sets, precision and genomic medicine, patient-driven care protocols, networked medical instrumentation, and telehealth become firmly entrenched in care-giving.

USB drives are trouble

USB drives are trouble

Useful, powerful, small, cheap, and very easy to use. More things in life should be like USB drives, also known as flash drives, memory sticks, thumb drives, or USB keys. Since they were introduced in 2001 their increase in storage capacity has only been matched by their decrease in price. Fun fact: When first introduced, a 128-megabyte flash drive cost about $30. Now you can get 512 gigabytes for that price, and they’ve become devices most people can’t live without. Like all power tools, though, they must be treated with care and can cause a lot of damage if misused.

How frustrating is it to lose a smartphone?

How frustrating is it to lose a smartphone?

How frustrating is it to lose a smartphone? $650,000 worth, if you are Catholic Health Care Services of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. An employee of theirs lost an iPhone last year. It’s easy to do so – but the iPhone was not encrypted, was not password protected, and had extensive ePHI on it. Most workers would say that they don't store ePHI on their phone. They don't use it to access an EMR, open any spreadsheets, or take any notes on their phone. However, ePHI, like water, has a way of leaking out to unexpected places. If you get corporate email on your phone, then you've probably been CC'd on a message with an attached spreadsheet, which often has ePHI. If you've installed Dropbox, or a similar app, on your phone, the data is usually accessible, especially if you've got auto-login enabled - or if the app catches any data locally.